Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online:374
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
CASE REPORT
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 97-99

A technical report of postmastectomy axillary web syndrome symptom management using ultrasound-guided trigger point injections


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA
2 Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Pain Management, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA
3 Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA
4 Department of Emergency Medicine; Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jessica Oswald
Department of Anesthesiology, University of California, 200 W Harbor Dr, #8770, San Diego, CA 92103
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpn.ijpn_105_21

Rights and Permissions

Axillary web syndrome (AWS) is a painful and difficult-to-manage complication of breast surgery with axillary lymph node dissection. Patients may believe that symptoms, including the presence of palpable axillary cords and reduced shoulder mobility, are a normal part of postoperative recovery. Both physician and patient education regarding this quality-of-life impairing condition is needed. In this report, we describe treating AWS using ultrasound-guided trigger point injections to avoid inadvertent damage to the neighboring lung, nerve, lymph nodes, and/or vasculature. There is limited information on their utility in treating AWS. At 4-month follow-up, our patient reported 70% improvement in her pain and discontinuation of her opioid medications, along with increased functionality. Ultrasound played a critical role in enhancing procedure accuracy and safety in zones that contain important nerve and vascular tissue and decreasing the risk of iatrogenic injury. While ultrasound was used historically for diagnostic purposes, we show why its use for interventions is on the rise.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed254    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded28    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal